"You are personally responsible for becoming more ethical than the society you grew up in."

Eliezer Yudkowsky  (via rampias)

Being a “product of their times” is no excuse. Never let someone off the hook for bigotry. 

(via callingoutbigotry)

"If you’ve been up all night and cried till you have no more tears left in you - you will know that there comes in the end a sort of quietness. You feel as if nothing was ever going to happen again."
— C.S. Lewis, The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe (via blurrymelancholy)
"You don’t start out writing good stuff. You start out writing crap and thinking it’s good stuff, and then gradually you get better at it. That’s why I say one of the most valuable traits is persistence."
— Octavia E. Butler (via perfect-progression)
"Dress suitably in short skirts and strong boots, leave your jewels in the bank, and buy a revolver"
Countess Markievicz, 19th century Irish revolutionary, dispensing eternally relevant fashion advice. (via ronanlunch)
"Someone you haven’t even met yet is wondering what it’d be like to know someone like you."
— (via undistanced)
"If you use magic in fiction, the first thing you have to do is put barriers up. There must be limits to magic. If you can snap your fingers and make anything happen, where’s the fun in that? … The story really starts when you put limits on magic. Where fantasy gets a bad name is when anything can happen because a wizard snaps his fingers. Magic has to come with a cost, probably a much bigger cost than when things are done by what is usually called ‘the hard way.’"
— Terry Pratchett, author of the Discworld series, on writing magic. (via moniquill)
"Mental illness is like fighting a war where the enemy’s strategy is to convince you that the war isn’t actually happening."
"No amount of smiling at a flight of stairs has ever made it turn into a ramp. Ever"
Stella Young on why the saying “the only disability in life is a bad attitude,” is bullshit. (via spasticfantastic1995)
"We think of men as antiheroes, as capable of occupying an intense and fascinating moral grey area; of being able to fall, and rise, and fall again, but still be worthy of love on some fundamental level, because if it was the world and its failings that broke them, then we surely must owe them some sympathy. But women aren’t allowed to be broken by the world; or if we are, it’s the breaking that makes us villains. Wronged women turn into avenging furies, inhuman and monstrous: once we cross to the dark side, we become adversaries to be defeated, not lost souls in need of mending. Which is what happens, when you let benevolent sexism invest you in the idea that women are humanity’s moral guardians and men its native renegades: because if female goodness is only ever an inherent quality – something we’re born both with and to be – then once lost, it must necessarily be lost forever, a severed limb we can’t regrow. Whereas male goodness, by virtue of being an acquired quality – something bestowed through the kindness of women, earned through right action or learned through struggle – can just as necessarily be gained and lost multiple times without being tarnished, like a jewel we might pawn in hardship, and later reclaim."

Foz Meadows (Gender, Orphan Black & The Meta of Meta)

Look at your stories - don’t just count who gets to be the hero and the villain (what kind of hero? what kind of villain?); count who gets the redemption arcs.

(via notsosilentsister)

And how does race impact this, especially if we’re talking about women of color in the anti-hero or redeemed villain role?

(via onceuponameta)

Reblogging again for follow-up questions.

(via eshusplayground)