archiemcphee:

Behold the delicate beauty and cleverness of this interactive Japanese children’s book by Megumi Kajiwara and Tathuhiko Nijima. Entitled Motion Silhouette, the handmade book features white pop-up silhouettes between each page. Shining a light on either side of the silhouettes cast moving shadows onto the pages that help tell the story. Ghosts appear before frightened a sleeper, a train travels down tracks and across the face of the moon, someone makes a wish on a dandelion head and then blows out birthday candles, butterflies flutter and what appears as a tree on one page turns into lightning flashing above a cityscape on another.

Click here to watch a brief video that offers a closer look at this enchanting book.

Motion Silhouette is a sequel to a previous book by Kajiwara and Nijima entitled Silhouette. These beautiful works of interactive art are handmade to order.Click here for order inquiries.

[via Colossal]

medievalpoc:

medievalpoc:

Bitch Magazine Series: Girls of Color in Dystopian YA Fantasy Literature

This current guest series by Victoria Law includes book reviews, analysis of race and tends in YA literature, questions about race and gender in Dystopic narratives, interviews with authors and more.

Reblogging for Fiction Week!

ghazrat:

booktown:

i need this on my wall 

I need that wall AS a wall. With this print somewhere on that wall.

ghazrat:

booktown:

i need this on my wall 

I need that wall AS a wall. With this print somewhere on that wall.

mysharona1987:

Some of the funniest book dedications ever.

lgbtqblogs:

10 wonderful children’s books on marriage equality

1.  And Tango Makes Three
And Tango Makes Three is a 2005 children’s book written by Peter Parnell and Justin Richardson and illustrated by Henry Cole. This tale about the meaning of family is based on a true story about a charming penguin family living in New York City’s Central Park Zoo. Roy and Silo, two male penguins, are “a little bit different.” The book follows the six years of their life when they formed a couple and were given an egg to raise. Done in soft watercolors, the illustrations set the tone for this uplifting story, and readers will find it hard to resist the penguins’ expressions. An author’s note provides more information about Roy, Silo, Tango, and other chinstrap penguins.
2. Mommy, Mama, and Me
Rhythmic text and illustrations with universal appeal show a toddler spending the day with its mommies. From hide-and-seek to dress-up, then bath time and a kiss goodnight, there’s no limit to what a loving family can do together. Shares the loving bond between same-sex parents and their children. Written by Lesléa Newman  and illustrated by Carol Thompson.
3. A Tale of Two Mommies
A Tale of Two Mommies is a beach conversation among three children. One boy asks another boy about having two mommies. A young girl listening in asks some questions too. True to a child’s curiosity, practical questions follow. “Which mom is there when you want to go fishing? / Which mom helps out when Kitty goes missing?” To which he answers: “Mommy helps when I want to go fishing. / Both Mommies help when Kitty goes missing. Written by Vanita Oelschlager and illustrated by Mike Blanc, A Tale of Two Mommies is intended for 4-8 year olds.
4. The Family Book 
Written by Todd Parr, The Family Book celebrates the love we feel for our families and all the different varieties they come in. Whether you have two moms or two dads, a big family or a small family, a clean family or a messy one, Parr assures readers that no matter what kind of family you have, every family is special in its own unique way. Perfect for young children just beginning to read, The Family Book is designed to encourage early literacy, enhance emotional development, celebrate multiculturalism, promote character growth, and strengthen family relationships. 
5. Oh The Things Mommies Do!: What Could Be Better Than Having Two?
A playful celebration of Lesbian Mothers and their children! Oh The Things Mommies Do! is a bouncy, and playful look at the joys of a two Mom family. With its catchy rhymes and vibrant illustrations, it is a pleasure for children and parents alike. Written by Crystal Tompkins and illustrated by Lindsey Evans.
6. The Different Dragon
Written by Jennifer Bryan and illustrated by Danamarle Hosler, this bedtime story about bedtime stories shows how the wonderful care and curiosity of a little boy, with some help from his willing moms, can lead to magical and unexpected places. Join Noah and his cat, Diva, on this nighttime adventure and you too will leave with an unforgettable new dragon friend.
7. In Our Mothers’ House
Marmee, Meema, and the kids are just like any other family on the block. In their beautiful and filled with love house, they cook dinner together, they laugh together, and they dance together. And they also teach their children that different doesn’t mean wrong. Written and illustrated by Patricia Polacco.
8. Daddy, Papa, and Me
Rhythmic text and illustrations with universal appeal show a toddler spending the day with its daddies. From hide-and-seek to dress-up, then bath time and a kiss goodnight, there’s no limit to what a loving family can do together. Share the loving bond between same-sex parents and their children. Written by Lesléa Newman  and illustrated by Carol Thompson.
9. King and King
When a grouchy queen tells her layabout son that it’s time for him to marry, he sighs, “Very well, Mother…. I must say, though, I’ve never cared much for princesses.” This is a way of explaining homosexuality to your children so you can raise an accepting, wonderful human being. Written by Linda de Haan and Stern Nijland
10. My Uncle’s Wedding
There’s so much to do now that Uncle Mike and Steve are getting married. Follow Andy on this enjoyable journey as he talks about his uncle’s wedding, how it affects him, and the things he gets to do in preparation for the ceremony. You’ll laugh and smile as you read this adorable story about marriage and family. Written by Eric Ross and illustrated by r), Tracy K Green.
faokryn:

theprettygoodgatsby:

firebirdy:

This may be the best book I have ever purchased. It is definitely in the top 10

whAT BOOK IS THIS

To Be or Not to Be by Ryan North.  Hamlet as a choose-your-own-adventure book.

faokryn:

theprettygoodgatsby:

firebirdy:

This may be the best book I have ever purchased. It is definitely in the top 10

whAT BOOK IS THIS

To Be or Not to Be by Ryan North.  Hamlet as a choose-your-own-adventure book.

Disability in Kidlit seeks disabled reviewers

disabilityinkidlit:

Disability in Kidlit publishes reviews of recent MG & YA novels featuring prominent disabled characters. Our reviews discuss both the technical and cultural accuracy of the disability portrayed and any stereotypes, tropes, implications, et cetera. What’s important: all reviews are done by people who share the disability under discussion—or at least a similar one. (See here for details.)

And there are a lot of books with disabled characters we’d love to see reviewed! We’re reaching out to the glory that is Tumblr to help us share this request for review submissions.

The catch: we’re run on a volunteer basis and don’t have the funds to purchase copies for our reviewers. We’ll do our best to help—we have some connections to authors/publishers and will happily reach out to them for you—but we mostly rely on our reviewers to purchase or borrow their own copies. The books we can provide with certainty are italicized.

We welcome reviews of any recent middle grade/young adult book by a major publisher, but here’s a list of books we’d particularly like to see reviewed:

ALBINISM
Akata Witch
Golden Boy
The Tragedy Paper

AMPUTATION
The Drowned Cities (hand, acquired)
The Fault in our Stars (secondary character; below the knee, acquired)
Otherbound (below the knee, acquired)
The Running Dream (below the knee, acquired)

AUTISM
Colin Fischer
The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time
Harmonic Feedback
Rogue
Rules (secondary character)

BLINDNESS
Blind Spot
Girl, Stolen
She Is Not Invisible

CEREBRAL PALSY
Out of My Mind (MC uses a wheelchair and learns to communicate via assistive tech)
Say What You Will (MC uses a walker and computerized voice box)
Summer on the Short Bus (secondary characters)

DEAFNESS
The Dark Days of Hamburger Halpin
El Deafo
Five Flavors of Dumb
Invincible Summer (secondary character)
Wonderstruck

DOWN SYNDROME
Dead Ends
Summer on the Short Bus
(secondary characters)

EPILEPSY
100 Sideways Miles

LIMPS and related
The Beginning of Everything (shattered knee)
The Demon’s Lexicon trilogy (secondary character; acquired limp)
Handbook for Dragon Slayers (MC has clubfoot)

MUTENESS
Otherbound (MC communicates via sign language)

OCD
Ball Don’t Lie
Don’t Touch
OCD, the Dude, and Me
OCD Love Story
Say What You Will

PTSD
The Mara Dyer trilogy
Something Like Normal
Speak

SCHIZOPHRENIA
Freaks Like Us

WHEELCHAIR USERS
(not including those already listed in other categories)
Knife (secondary character)
Rules (secondary character)


Please contact us at disabilityinkidlit@gmail.com if you’re interested in submitting a review or if you have any questions. We’d love to hear from you!

Also, if you can provide a review copy of any of the above books, contact us so we can update the list—and thank you!

Smaller Books

karnythia:

deducecanoe:

librarean:

sunshinegames:

Today I helped a family new to the United States get library cards. After giving them the rundown on what a library membership means, I showed the kids the children’s area. The mother told them they could each check out two books. The smallest child, a girl of seven, picked out two small board books.

“Are you sure you don’t want a picture book?” I asked her, showing her a few new ones on display.

“Too much money,” she said.

“What do you mean?” I asked.

“These cost less, right? They smaller.”

It hit me what she was saying: she was trying to save her parents money by choosing the smallest books.

“Do you know what?” I said. “All of this is free, no money. You can choose whichever books you want.”

She turned her head to look at the shelves of books and gasped at the bounty. She wandered away without another word and I watched her pick up book after book, shuffling through each one, making little piles, studying each one intently.

I’ve never been more proud I chose this career.

Adorable.

Libraries ARE important. And the only people who think they aren’t are the people who have enough resources to get the things a library holds with money. The rest of us need the library and the librarian and people who don’t think the building, its contents, and the person are important are classist.

Oh god this story…libraries are so important. Also? I want to know what kind of heartless fuck thinks books aren’t important to kids.

moniquill:

thatdamneddame:

the-writers-ramblings:

i cant even make it past the table of contents im laughing too hard

from the book “Zeus Grants Stupid Wishes: A No-Bullshit Guide to World Mythology” from the dude who made the myths retold website. check check check it out

WANT.

moniquill:

thatdamneddame:

the-writers-ramblings:

i cant even make it past the table of contents im laughing too hard

from the book “Zeus Grants Stupid Wishes: A No-Bullshit Guide to World Mythology” from the dude who made the myths retold website. check check check it out

WANT.