thebicker:

inothernews:

allisonunsupervised:

coolchicksfromhistory:

thelifeguardlibrarian:

mildhorror:

Here’s the link for more information about the PS244 fundraising campaign

Here’s the link to the GIVE IT ALL TO ME Library Collection at OutofPrintClothing.com.

Check it out! The good folks dropped me a line about this project last week, and I’m happy to boost for Library Week.

Signal boost

So hey, #education…

I love these.  Love them.  And for a great cause.

Happy National Library Week!



malindalo:

diversityinya:

10 Diverse YA Historicals About Girls

In honor of Women’s History Month, here are 10 diverse young adult historical novels about girls. Descriptions are from Worldcat.

Mare’s War by Tanita S. Davis (Alfred A. Knopf)

Teens Octavia and Tali learn about strength, independence, and courage when they are forced to take a car trip with their grandmother, who tells about growing up Black in 1940s Alabama and serving in Europe during World War II as a member of the Women’s Army Corps.

Wildthorn by Jane Eagland (Houghton Mifflin)

Seventeen-year-old Louisa Cosgrove is locked away in the Wildthorn Hall mental institution, where she is stripped of her identity and left to wonder who has tried to destroy her life.

The Lightning Dreamer: Cuba’s Greatest Abolitionist by Margarita Engle (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt)

In free verse, evokes the voice of Gertrudis Gomez de Avellaneda, a book-loving writer, feminist, and abolitionist who courageously fought injustice in nineteenth-century Cuba. Includes historical notes, excerpts from her writings, biographical information, and source notes.

Willow by Tonya Cherie Hegamin (Candlewick Press)

In 1848 Willow, a fifteen-year-old educated slave girl, faces an inconceivable choice – between bondage and freedom, family and love – as free born, seventeen-year-old Cato, a black man, takes it upon himself to sneak as many fugitive slaves to freedom as he can on the Mason-Dixon Line.

The Fire Horse Girl by Kay Honeyman (Arthur A. Levine Books)

When Jade Moon, born in the unlucky year of the Fire Horse, and her father immigrate to America in 1923 and are detained at Angel Island Immigration Station, Jade Moon is determined to find a way through and prove that she is not cursed.

The Revolution of Evelyn Serrano by Sonia Manzano (Scholastic)

It is 1969 in Spanish Harlem, and fourteen-year-old Evelyn Serrano is trying hard to break free from her conservative Puerto Rican surroundings, but when her activist grandmother comes to stay and the neighborhood protests start, things get a lot more complicated–and dangerous.

Anahita’s Woven Riddle by Meghan Nuttall Sayres (Amulet)

In Iran, more than 100 years ago, a young girl with three suitors gets permission from her father and a holy man to weave into her wedding rug a riddle to be solved by her future husband, which will ensure that he has wit to match hers.

Climbing the Stairs by Padma Venkatraman (Penguin)

In India, in 1941, when her father becomes brain-damaged in a non-violent protest march, fifteen-year-old Vidya and her family are forced to move in with her father’s extended family and become accustomed to a totally different way of life.

Rose Under Fire by Elizabeth Wein (Hyperion)

When young American pilot Rose Justice is captured by Nazis and sent to Ravensbrück, the notorious women’s concentration camp, she finds hope in the impossible through the loyalty, bravery, and friendship of her fellow prisoners.

Daughter of Xanadu by Dori Jones Yang (Delacorte)

Emmajin, the sixteen-year-old eldest granddaughter of Khublai Khan, becomes a warrior and falls in love with explorer Marco Polo in thirteenth-century China.

I really enjoyed WILDTHORN, which is a rare YA historical about two girls in love. It’s totally Sarah Waters for the YA market.







xmaurinex:

slow-riot:

Asking the tough questions

holy shit.

xmaurinex:

slow-riot:

Asking the tough questions

holy shit.



immolator:

so i have this book on norweigan grammar… a load of examples are to do with fascism and revolutions. it’s like it’s trying to tell me something…
ummm?

immolator:

so i have this book on norweigan grammar… a load of examples are to do with fascism and revolutions. it’s like it’s trying to tell me something…

ummm?



cleromancy:

hello friends. these are books by my friend jill, a very kind and talented up and coming queer writer who is currently in a spot of financial trouble. each book is an anthology of short pieces about relationships and they’re all available on amazon for $1.75. 

yeah. $1.75. that is a fucking steal, especially since jill’s stories are fuckin BEAUTIFUL. each one skillfully details complicated dynamics in a short number of words, crafting characters that draw you in by the first lines; each piece focuses on humanity and emotions and the complexities therein. 

and she doesn’t get ANY royalties from amazon if she doesn’t sell a certain number of books each month, so please, please consider buying her books, or signal boosting if you can’t afford it right now. if you do buy one, please leave a positive review (even just stars if you can’t figure out what to write), because it helps with exposure and stuff. 

Ugly Whining Noises; Soft Humming Sounds; Quiet Buzzing Tones; Obnoxious Laugh Tracks; Garbage Truck of Emotions

she could really use your support in any way you can give it—signal boosting, buying the books, leaving amazon reviews, skywriting ‘buy jills books’, etc—so!!! please help her out 



raptorific:

Nia and I found this book in the library. There is no context, description, or listed author. Every page is a picture of Humphrey Bogart. The only words we could find were the title and the dedication.



1.26.14 Chinese Space Opera Trilogy coming to US

ouyangdan:

jhameia:

kynodontas:

A wildly successful Chinese space opera epic is coming to the US courtesy of a new translation in 2014. The Three Body trilogy by Liu Cixin has sold hundreds of thousands of copies in China, renewing interest in hard science fiction in the country.

"When asked about what the books bring to American audiences, Liu notes that they provide a different perspective on the world: ‘American readers might be particularly interested in the way the book engages with issues in Chinese history and contemporary Chinese society, and I think they will find the book’s non-US-centric view of twentieth-century history intriguing.’”

:}

oh my god

that looks amazing

AAAAAA that looks amazing.

And out of curiosity, I wonder if I can find a place to get the originals and not the translations.



sourcedumal:

ekom-aka-makoma:

Not sure why I haven’t read this yet. It’s time.

Buying this

sourcedumal:

ekom-aka-makoma:

Not sure why I haven’t read this yet.
It’s time.

Buying this